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Wood Species

Domestic Woods

EXOTIC WOODS

American Cherry

A classic choice for fine furniture. Slightly reddish in appearance, cherry can also be stained in a range of tones.

Distressed Walnut

Not limited to just walnut, distressing gives your top a head start on developing that worn in patina that makes antique furniture so wonderful. This looks great with detailed edge profiles, and can ease concerns of nicking and scratching the top in high use areas.

Hard Maple

Unquestionably, maple is THE traditional countertop wood. Its use in European butchers blocks goes back centuries, and its durability is perfect for tops that will be cut on directly.

Reclaimed Heart Pine

Typically salvaged from the timbers of old buildings, this strong, dense pine from the "heart" of the tree is of a quality simply unavailable from modern forests. The rich, reddish hue develops from the concentration of resins and the tight grain from centuries of slow and steady growth. We particularly enjoy repurposing these old timbers to be enjoyed for the next 100 years.

Hickory

Known for its strength, hickory exhibits variations from cream to dark brown, sometimes in the same board. This can be used to great effect in an edge-grain top.

Sable Walnut

Tannins are what make great tea and wine possible, and wood has varying amounts of tannins as well. To make sable walnut, we take advantage of the way these tannins in walnut react to certain treatments. This makes for a deep, dark walnut with maximum clarity of the grain.

Sapele

Sapele is very similar to traditional mahogany, but is a more sustainable timber. It is used in place of mahogany in modern fine furniture and guitars.

Sapele

End Grain

Sapele is very similar to traditional mahogany, but is a more sustainable timber. It is used in place of mahogany in modern fine furniture and guitars.

Walnut
with Sapwood

This style incorporates the sapwood of the tree, which is the lighter, slightly softer outer wood of the tree just before the bark. The result is dramatic streaks of chocolate and vanilla.

Walnut

In recent years, walnut has eclipsed maple as the wood of choice for countertops. Also known as black walnut, its deep brown tones have traditionally been used in fine furniture and gunstocks.

Walnut

End Grain

End Grain walnut, like all end grain, is extra durable and ideal for working cutting surfaces.

Weathered White Oak

Our take on "barn wood" has both that great looking greyish color and the smooth finish needed for a functional work surface. Truly the best of old and new!